1-pPTVoOkvhvKMRjJqa99g8g

Tattletale Tax Reporting Law Violates Consumer Privacy, Coloradans Say

Overwhelming Majority Say State Should Not Be Collecting Personal Information on Shopping Habits, NetChoice Survey Finds

An overwhelming majority of Coloradans believe a state law forcing online and catalog businesses to report personal purchase information to state tax authorities is an invasion of privacy, per a new NetChoice survey of Colorado residents.* Residents also view the law’s misguided aim to collect sales and use taxes as a statewide tax increase.

Fully 78 percent of Coloradans said the state should not be allowed to force businesses to turn over information on their internet purchases, including the retailer’s name, the customer’s name, the billing address, the shipping address, and the amount of purchases. Read more

tickets-concert-79655

Don’t let ticket companies take a fundamental freedom in Virginia

Twenty-five years ago, Seinfeld warned us of the dangers of double-dipping. However, double-dipping is not relegated only to hors d’oeuvres and sitcoms. In the real world, Ticketmaster has perfected the double dip, reaping billions of dollars by managing events and selling tickets on the primary market.

For years, Ticketmaster has dipped into the revenues of bands and other acts via its Live Nation Entertainment Group and then dipped into the discretionary income of consumers, charging fees per ticket sale on the primary market.

Now, the company has its sights set on a new challenge: the triple dip.

READ MORE at the Washington Post

screen-shot-2017-01-06-at-8-22-49-pm

Steve DelBianco speaks with Small Business Radio

Part 1: We’re losing the battle for online taxes and consumer privacy

Part 2: The ongoing war for privacy and security in the cloud

Part 3: How much online freedom did you lose in 2016?

buying-online

The Lame Duck Is No Time to Cripple Internet Commerce

Online and catalog retailers around the country have made it clear to Congress that a radical remote sales tax mandate would cause severe hardships for their businesses and consumers across the United States.

As we enter the “lame duck,” the post-election session of this Congress, we are likely to see an effort to pass the Marketplace Fairness Act, even though this bill has not been on the floor of the House or Senate and has never even had a committee hearing. Our leaders in Congress should resist any effort to move MFA in the lame duck or attach it to must-pass legislation.

READ MORE at Morning Consult

san-francisco-1633202_960_720

Why is San Francisco trying to strangle its golden goose?

Detroit doesn’t place burdensome regulations on automobile manufacturers; Idaho doesn’t put undue restrictions and hurdles in front of potato farmers; and California takes steps to protect its farmers — because these industries are part of the lifeblood and identity of their respective states.

These industries do more than just create jobs, tax revenue and prestige — they became a symbol of who they are, part of the fabric of the community and the economy.

READ MORE at TechCrunch

Colorado

Denver Post – A level playing field for fantasy sports in Colorado

More than 2.5 million fans are expected to attend games at Coors Field this season. And many are expected to be playing along on their computers and smartphones, too, with fantasy sports enhancing the fan experience like never before.

That is why Colorado lawmakers are on the right track with proposed legislation to preserve fans’ access to these services.

READ More at Denver Post

home_sharing

Austin on verge of dealing a big blow to sharing economy, and this has nothing to do with Uber

For the past three years, Austinites have enjoyed all the inherent freedoms of home ownership. But some of those freedoms could vanish if the Austin City Council passes City Code 25 on Thursday.
In 2013, Austin led the state, and the nation, in adopting sensible short-term rental regulations. This allowed homeowners across the city to offer short-term rentals to visitors and Austinites.

Read More at Austin Business Journal

1*PBC0sZ4bXdAECof8vQ9Akg

Is Your Internet Bill About to Go Up?

When you look at your mobile and home internet bills, have you ever noticed the taxes and fees section?

Well if some in Congress get their way, these taxes could be even higher — with many of us paying an extra $20 per month for online access
(18% tax rate on home internet and mobile bills totaling $110 per month).
Read more

sharingeconomy900x4002

Protecting the freedoms of the sharing economy

Technology has always promised to give us the freedom to work where, when, and how we want.  And, in the past two years we have truly seen this become a reality.

We call it the sharing economy.  People are able to leverage their expertise or skill without the need for a traditional employer.  But old world cartels are trying to stop the new freedoms granted to us by this new economy.

READ More at The Hill

taxes_onlin-100006770-gallery

Two bills that should be on everyone’s “Don’t Pass” list

With Congress back from the August recess, attention will quickly shift to the “Must Pass” legislation that has to be approved by the end of the year to avoid calamity.  But there are two Internet sales tax bills that should be on everyone’s “Don’t Pass” list, because if either is slipped into moving legislation, it would be a calamity for America’s small- and medium-sized businesses.

We’re talking about the fatally flawed Marketplace Fairness Act (MFA) and the Remote Transaction Parity Act (RTPA), which was supposed to fix the problems with MFA, but actually made a bad bill even worse.

MFA would force America’s online and catalog sellers to comply with the sales tax laws of 10,000 local jurisdictions in our nation, creating costly administrative and compliance burden on small- and medium-sized businesses that can scarcely afford it.  It would also expose every single American business to new risks of government audits from any of the 46 states that impose a sales tax.

READ MORE at The Hill