The regulatory landscape facing ride-share drivers

Technology has given us more freedom to choose the way we work, live, travel, and shop.  But many Americans are hitting bureaucratic roadblocks on their way find full-and part-time work with peer-to-peer services like Lyft, Postmates, and Handy.  These roadblocks are not just bad for workers, but also for consumers, commerce, and the tax revenue that comes with it.

Some of these roadblocks are intentionally created by incumbents trying to prevent competition.  But others are just legacy rules and laws that impede the fast-moving trend of workers moving into more flexible, freelance forms of employment.

READ More at Capitol Weekly

Seattle shouldn’t try to force unions on Uber, Lyft drivers

As a father with two kids and full-time job, I love the fact that I can choose when and where I want to drive for Lyft. But an ordinance in Seattle could change the face of ridesharing as we know it. And not just for the Emerald City, but for the entire nation.

Fellow drivers in Seattle are in danger of losing many of the freedoms that make ridesharing so appealing. Drivers no longer would be able to work when, where and how long they want. They could be forced into legally binding agreement that mandate minimum or maximum working hours and limit their shifts to certain days or set times.

READ More at The Hill

Why is San Francisco trying to strangle its golden goose?

Detroit doesn’t place burdensome regulations on automobile manufacturers; Idaho doesn’t put undue restrictions and hurdles in front of potato farmers; and California takes steps to protect its farmers — because these industries are part of the lifeblood and identity of their respective states.

These industries do more than just create jobs, tax revenue and prestige — they became a symbol of who they are, part of the fabric of the community and the economy.

READ MORE at TechCrunch

Let New Yorkers advertise extra space

Home-sharing and short-term rentals have been a boon to New Yorkers and other citizens across the country, enabling homeowners to better afford skyrocketing rents and home prices in the nation’s hottest real estate markets. In addition, it has provided tourists and business travelers with additional lodging options and kept neighborhood restaurants and businesses bustling.

READ MORE at Times Union

Carl Szabo speaks About Home Sharing on Tech Policy Podcast

More at TechFreedom

 

A Victory for Innovation — How Arizona is Protecting the Short Term Rental Economy

Kudos to the state of Arizona State for proving that innovative problem solving is alive and well in the Grand Canyon State.

This past week, Governor Ducey signed into law landmark legislation that creates a blueprint for how all states should handle home sharing platforms such as HomeAway and Airbnb.  Not willing to rely on out-of-date, arcane regulation, created long before the first .com, Arizona chose the path of regulatory and legislative disruption. The result was Senate Bill 1350. Read more