Retailers unite! Counter divide-and-conquer tactics on online sales tax

If other states copy a South Dakota law, businesses would face sales tax audits from across the country and costly software changes.

Divide-and-conquer is a tried-and-true strategy to defeat a superior enemy. It works in war and in business, but perhaps nowhere more so than in politics.  When it comes to online sales tax, state tax administrators and legislators managed to divide the retail business community in their drive to gain new tax powers at the expense of consumer choice and small business growth.

READ MORE at Internet Retailer


ACMA and NetChoice File Legal Challenge against South Dakota’s “Blatantly Unconstitutional” Internet Sales Tax Law

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Internet Sales Tax DelBianco v Bramble

Debating Internet Sales Taxes – Steve DelBianco (NetChoice) v UT Sen. Curt Bramble (NSCL)


Taxes File Containing Taxation Reports And Documents

Why this tax bill is unfair

April 15 is one of the least liked and certainly the most expensive days of the year for many Americans. It is Tax Day when we all must ensure that we have paid our fair share. But, if big-box retailers get their way, every day will be tax day for small online sellers.

At both the federal and state levels big box stores are lobbying for new unfair taxes on our nation’s small internet retailers.

Read More at CNBC.com

Taxes File Containing Taxation Reports And Documents

Utah Citizens: Internet Sales Tax System Works Fine, Don’t Mess With It

Sixty-seven percent said that imposing sales tax obligations on businesses that have no physical presence in the state would amount to a statewide sales increase.

Sixty-seven percent of Utahns said the “issue has largely solved itself and requiring small merchants to collect and send taxes to 46 states is overly burdensome.” Only 16 percent said there “should be federal or state laws that require merchants large and small to collect and pay taxes to tax collection agencies in nearly every state.”

Utahns support the current online sales tax system. An overwhelming 78 percent said that the current system is “fine, I like it as it is.” Only 8 percent said “it needs to change. More purchases should be taxed.”

Read the Polling at NetChoice.org/UtahTaxPoll

Steve DelBianco Speaks on TPA’s “Taxpayer Watch Podcast”

Also available here


Is Your Internet Bill About to Go Up?

When you look at your mobile and home internet bills, have you ever noticed the taxes and fees section?

Well if some in Congress get their way, these taxes could be even higher — with many of us paying an extra $20 per month for online access
(18% tax rate on home internet and mobile bills totaling $110 per month).
Read more

Kojo Nnamdi Show – Taxing Your Online Shopping Spree

Steve DelBianco speaks about internet sales tax issues.

Link to Kojo Nnamdi 


Why Are We Importing Europe’s Broken Internet Sales Tax System?

As Congress weighs Internet sales tax proposals, it should look to Europe’s unpleasant experience with the Value Added Tax (VAT) system for guidance on what not to do.

The European Commission (EC) is calling for major reform of its current tax collection system for its 28 member countries because the VAT has proven harmful to retailers and is slowing cross-border purchases. Now the EC is advocating for a tax structure based not on where the buyer is (as is currently the case), but on where the seller is, helping to create what it calls a “Single Digital Market.”

Read more at Forbes.com


Two bills that should be on everyone’s “Don’t Pass” list

With Congress back from the August recess, attention will quickly shift to the “Must Pass” legislation that has to be approved by the end of the year to avoid calamity.  But there are two Internet sales tax bills that should be on everyone’s “Don’t Pass” list, because if either is slipped into moving legislation, it would be a calamity for America’s small- and medium-sized businesses.

We’re talking about the fatally flawed Marketplace Fairness Act (MFA) and the Remote Transaction Parity Act (RTPA), which was supposed to fix the problems with MFA, but actually made a bad bill even worse.

MFA would force America’s online and catalog sellers to comply with the sales tax laws of 10,000 local jurisdictions in our nation, creating costly administrative and compliance burden on small- and medium-sized businesses that can scarcely afford it.  It would also expose every single American business to new risks of government audits from any of the 46 states that impose a sales tax.

READ MORE at The Hill