Don’t Shoot the Message Board – Section 230’s Importance to American Jobs

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For antitech activists, no fine is too high — Even $5 Billion from Facebook

Following the news that Facebook set aside $3 billion to pay an FTC fine of up to $5 billion, many in D.C. wait for news about the FTC’s investigation into the social media business.

Yet, antitech advocates already decided that the yet to be announced FTC fine is not enough.

Read more on Medium…

Don’t want your online data tracked? You could sign up for a list under Hawley’s bill

Kansas City Star

“By preventing the use of interest-based ads, this bill will result in more ads, more paywalls, and less content,” said Carl Szabo, vice president and general counsel of NetChoice, a group that represents the tech industry.

“Sen. Hawley’s bill undermines small online businesses trying to compete with large incumbents by preventing them from making the most from their smaller user base.The bill most helps large businesses with trusted names while kneecapping future competitors.”

Lower taxes work for Texas, why are lawmakers trying to create new ones?

Despite the histrionics of high-tax enthusiasts, new tax cuts are producing incredible revenue for state tax coffers. Texas alone has seen a 15 percent tax revenue increase this year. And Texas Comptroller Hegar expects an 8 percent growth in the state’s tax collections over the next two years — an extra $9 billion more to the state.

Read more at Medium

Chris Hughes May Have Helped Found Facebook, But He’s Wrong on Antitrust

Former Facebook employee Chris Hughes recently published an oped complaining about his former employer, It’s Time to Break Up Facebook. While passionate, this oped is riddled with half-truths, unsupported statements and flatly wrong assertions.

This article attempts to manipulate the reader — starting with a parade of horribles about Facebook in order to make readers more susceptible to suggestion. The author, Chris Hughes, then closes with “recommended solutions” that not only threaten our national security, but undermine America’s founding principles.

Read more at Medium

DMCA Notice and Takedown Just won’t work for Content Moderation

A new argument for “reforming” content moderation law is replacing Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act with a Section 512 of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) notice and takedown for copyrighted material approach for all content moderation. In essence, the proposal would require platforms like Reddit or Yelp to takedown comments and reviews upon notice from the disparaged party — similar to the notice and take-down model for copyright.

Read more at Medium

NetChoice Comments on FTC Facebook Fine

“The expected fine demonstrates to consumers and European regulators that the FTC is serious about privacy,” said Steve DelBianco, President of NetChoice. “The fine shows that American businesses should not trust any Cambridge University professor who promises to protect user data.”

“A multi billion dollar settlement is vastly greater than the UK’s $600,000 privacy fine and demonstrates the FTC is a serious enforcer of privacy laws,” said Carl Szabo, Vice President and General Counsel at NetChoice. “This is not a slam dunk case for the FTC. The FTC knows that if they overplay their hand they will lose in court.”

Tech Giants Should Have The Freedom To Kick Conservatives Off Their Platforms

This month, conservative senators held a hearing on tech companies “stifling free speech.” Before the hearing, senators read the decision of a Trump-appointed judge in Freedom Watch v. Google — a recent case tackling accusations of bias.

In the case, Judge Trevor McFadden threw out a lawsuit filed by Freedom Watch and activist Laura Loomer against YouTube, Facebook, Apple, and Twitter. Freedom Watch demanded the court stop the platforms from demonetizing and age-rating their content.

Read more at Daily Caller