Legislation Will Imperil Short-Term Renters from Anacostia to Brookland

Washington DC, November 12, 2018 – The future of short-term rentals (STRs) throughout the nation’s capital is being put at risk by DC Council Bill – B22-0092 which would introduce a licensing system that would eliminate nearly all current short-term rentals like Airbnb, HomeAway and VRBO.

The bill would:

  • impose zoning requirements that effectively eliminate nearly all short-term rentals;
  • require short-term rental platforms to share private information about hosts with the city government;
  • cost the city over $104 million in lost taxes and implementation costs;
  • eliminate short-term rental competition allowing big-hotels to gouge visitors to the nation’s capital.

“Big hotels are the only real winners of DC’s anti-home sharing bill.” said Carl Szabo, Vice President at NetChoice. “The city’s latest anti-tech action threatens resident’s privacy and financial security.”

“I can think of a better way for the city to spend $100 million.”

“DC is going after short-term rentals to the detriment of home owners and at a cost of $104 million,” continued Szabo. “The City Council’s proposed rules would burden residents who use STR platforms to help make ends meet.”

A copy of coalition opposition letter can be found at: https://netchoice.org/wp-content/uploads/Association-Joint-DC-Council-Letter-150.pdf

About NetChoice

NetChoice is a trade association of eCommerce and online businesses that share the goal of promoting convenience, choice, and commerce on the net.

American Action Forum - Comments On Developing The Administration's Approach To Consumer Privacy

An unwillingness to pay is a common finding and for good reason. Everyone would love to get something for nothing. Trade association NetChoice worked with Zogby Analytics to find that only 16 percent of people are willing to pay for online platform service. Strahilevitz and Kugler found that 65 percent of email users, even though they knew their email service scans emails to serve ads, wouldn’t pay for alternative.

Tax Notes – Concern Builds That Congress Could Act on Wayfair in Must-Pass Bill

Tax Notes – Concern Builds That Congress Could Act on Wayfair in Must-Pass Bill

Davison, Wayfair Inc.’s counsel George Isaacson of Brann & Isaacson, and Steve DelBianco of NetChoice initially met with the MTC in July to discuss industry’s proposal for federal legislation that would put conditions on the implementation of Wayfair. The discussions continued during the Streamlined Sales Tax Governing Board’s October meetings, where the industry leaders received pushback from the streamlined states.

NetChoice Opposition to District of Columbia Title II of B22-20, the Consumer Disclosure Act of 2017

NetChoice Opposition to District of Columbia Title II of B22-20, the Consumer Disclosure Act of 2017

Ticket News – Michigan Bill Could Legalize Ticket Scalping If Passed In Senate

Ticket News – Michigan Bill Could Legalize Ticket Scalping If Passed In Senate

Among those in support of the legislation is Carl Szabo, vice president of the eCommerce association NetChoice.

“NetChoice supports [the bill] as it updates an 80-year-old law that restricts Michigan fans’ ability to sell at market prices,” Szabo told Watchdog.org. “Michigan stands virtually alone with this restriction that harms the ability of fans to recoup their ticket expenses.”

Michigan Capitol Confidential – Little Guy Faces Jail For Scalping A Ticket, Corporations Do It Every Day

Michigan Capitol Confidential – Little Guy Faces Jail For Scalping A Ticket, Corporations Do It Every Day

NetChoice, an eCommerce association that includes several online companies, such as StubHub, eBay and Google, supports the legislation.

“NetChoice supports [the bill] as it updates an 80-year-old law that restricts Michigan fans’ ability to sell at market prices,” NetChoice Vice President Carl Szabo said. “Michigan stands virtually alone with this restriction that harms the ability of fans to recoup their ticket expenses.”

Szabo said the proposed law would put Michigan on equal footing with the rest of the country by allowing Michigan residents to sell their tickets at market price, which can sometimes fluctuate above the face value of the ticket.

“And to address the problem of unscrupulous ticket sellers, HB 4424 helps ensure that one group doesn’t use ‘bots’ to grab hundreds of tickets the minute they go on sale by making the use of technology illegal and empowering the [Michigan] attorney general to enforce,” Szabo said.

Washington Examiner – DC Council Should Give Residents a Break, Not Big Hotel Chains

Washington Examiner – DC Council Should Give Residents a Break, Not Big Hotel Chains

“A crackdown on short-term rentals would allow companies like Marriott and Hilton to raise room rates even higher. Even worse, D.C. would need to spend more than $100 million to enforce these new regulations on residents — including losing tax revenue earned from short-term rentals.

Imagine what the District could do if it spent $350 million on affordable housing rather than on this new handout to big hotels.”

Tech goes to the races

NetChoice, a trade group that counts Facebook and Google as members, sees “a real threat and not in a good way with [a] Democratically controlled House in advancing federal privacy legislation,” said general counsel Carl Szabo, who fears Democrats will resist pre-emption.