Congress takes on Big Tech in hearing on anti-competitive behavior among digital giants

1 Business World

One key industry group is already pushing back against the probe. NetChoice represents e-commerce giants ranging from Alibaba to Google to Travelocity and slammed Tuesday’s hearing as an attack on social media by legacy media.

“Big media is struggling to dominate again as they did before the internet,” said Carl Szabo, vice president and general counsel at NetChoice. “Rather than looking for government to tear down tech businesses, big media should follow tech’s lead and innovate so they are more competitive.”

Tech giants under fire: Is antitrust action the answer?

Mercury News

NetChoice, an e-commerce trade group, slammed the reported antitrust investigations.

“Pointless antitrust attacks on American businesses risk stalling out America’s tech leadership as competition from China is fiercer than ever before,” said Carl Szabo, NetChoice vice president and general counsel, in a statement.

Google has spent millions wooing friends in D.C. — but will they save them in an antitrust fight?

Politico

NetChoice, one tech industry group that counts Google as a member, defended the company amid the reports of potential DOJ scrutiny, predicting this probe would fizzle as well.

“Back in 2013, the FTC looked at Google and realized that there’s no ‘there’ there,” said Carl Szabo, the group’s general counsel. “So now I guess it’s DOJ’s turn to realize that there’s no ‘there’ there.”

Silicon Valley in the crosshairs: Google, Facebook, Amazon and Apple face bipartisan onslaught

Fox News

“The Justice Department’s investigation of Google will come to the same conclusion as the FTC’s did in 2013 — that there is no antitrust case,” said Carl Szabo, VP of NetChoice, an e-commerce trade association, in a statement to Fox News. “It’s illogical that the DOJ is investigating competitors in the same market for monopoly behavior. Amazon, Apple, and Google all compete with each other in a vibrant and competitive marketplace.”

Antitrust tech crusade will destroy trust in government and innovation

The Center Square

In a recent piece, NetChoice’s Carl Szabo implores bureaucrats to consider the local greeting card store. Szabo argues that, “A decade ago this business could barely afford to place an ad in a local newspaper, let alone on TV or radio. But for less than $10 spent with online platforms, this small business can reach thousands of potential customers, and target them more accurately than ever too.”

Antitrust Investigations into Apple, Amazon, and Google are Misguided

“The Justice Department’s investigation of Google will come to the same conclusion as the FTC’s did in 2013 — that there is no antitrust case,” said Carl Szabo, NetChoice Vice President and General Counsel.

“It’s illogical that the DOJ is investigating competitors in the same market for monopoly behavior. Amazon, Apple, and Google all compete with each other in a vibrant and competitive marketplace.”

“Consumers don’t have antitrust concerns with America’s tech industry. NetChoice polling from August 2018 shows that less than 5% of consumers say antitrust enforcement should be most focused on tech,” continued Szabo.

“Pointless antitrust attacks on American businesses risks stalling-out America’s tech leadership as competition from China is fiercer than ever before.”

Big Tech Fires Back at Elizabeth Warren’s ‘Break Up’ Billboard

Inside Sources

But a Big Tech trade group representing e-commerce businesses — NetChoice — called Warren’s billboard a “populist rant” without substance.

“I think what we’re starting to see is weaponization of antitrust law,” Carl Szabo, vice president and general counsel for NetChoice, told InsideSources. “We have over 100 years of antitrust law and enforcement and it’s always done on an objective base. You look at the market and competition and anticompetitive activities and then you do your conclusion. What we’re hearing from people like Elizabeth Warren is they want to move to a subjective test: ‘I don’t like that business, therefore it should be broken up.’ What’s ironic is in their efforts to allegedly protect consumers, many of the calls we’ve heard to break up tech would harm [consumers].”

Spotify’s Song of Relationship Problems With Apple Would Make Taylor Swift Proud

Morning Consult

Taylor Swift is famous for saying “Haters gonna hate” and it seems as though popular music streaming service Spotify has taken that lyric to heart as it launched its haters campaign against Apple Music. Spotify turned on the water works as it cried to European regulators that Apple was abusing its market power to prevent Spotify’s success. What’s worse, Europeans are listening to Spotify’s song of despair.

Pressure builds for FTC to punish Zuckerberg

The Hill

Carl Szabo, the vice president of the trade group NetChoice, which represents Facebook, said that such a move would be extreme and that “anti-tech activists” will not be satisfied no matter how far the FTC goes.

“I think the multibillion-dollar fine that we’ve been hearing about for some time is more than appropriate,” Szabo told The Hill. “Holding business leadership liable risks undermining innovation and leaves America open to foreign technological dominance.”

How to read a Facebook privacy settlement

Axios

The spin is already flowing. After Facebook predicted it would face a multibillion fine, the industry group NetChoice, which represents Facebook, said that the “expected fine demonstrates to consumers and European regulators that the FTC is serious about privacy.”