Tech Companies To Be Investigated With An “Open Mind”

Android Headlines

While most tech giants welcome regulation, they disagree that they are a monopoly. Most of these companies have been preparing for this investigation for a while, putting up a team of lawyers and policymakers to present their side of the story. The industry group NetChoice has sided with the internet giants and says that today’s hearing is an attempt by the big media to take government’s assistance to help them survive instead of innovating like social media companies.

Antitrust Hearings on the Hill

Politico Morning Tech

Americans for Prosperity’s Billy Easley said the committee should “avoid creating a political platform for aggrieved industries and companies to complain about their competitors.” And Carl Szabo of e-commerce trade group NetChoice blasted the hearing as “an attack on social media by big media companies upset that they no longer control our news and views.” Committee leaders, however, are standing by the session. “This is not, from my perspective, a beat-up of any one particular industry,” House Judiciary ranking member Doug Collins (R-Ga.) told Cristiano, adding that the hearing will explore “a real concern that’s being discussed out in the world.”

NetChoice Voices Concerns Over House Judiciary Committee Antitrust Hearing

Tomorrow, the House Judiciary Committee will hold a hearing entitled “Online Platforms and Market Power, Part 1: The Free and Diverse Press.” NetChoice is concerned that the hearing will be used to push for government to protect big media companies rather than to act in the interests of consumers.

“It’s clear this is just an attack on social media by big media companies upset that they no longer control our news and views,” said Carl Szabo, Vice President and General Counsel at NetChoice.

“Big media is showing its true colors by supporting antitrust exemptions for themselves, while demanding tougher antitrust enforcement on tech businesses.”

“It’s hypocritical for legislators to simultaneously complain about the size of tech businesses while seeking to pass a law to give more power to Rupert Murdoch and Carlos Slim.”

“Big media is struggling to dominate again as they did before the internet,” continued Szabo. “Rather than looking for government to tear down tech businesses, big media should follow tech’s lead and innovate so they are more competitive.”

Big Tech Break-Up Could Be a Messy Affair

Wall Street Journal

On June 6, 2019, Gene Kimmelman, CEO of Public Knowledge and Carl Szabo VP of NetChoice, discuss the possibility of a Big Tech antitrust push by Congress against Google, Facebook, and Amazon.

Congress takes on Big Tech in hearing on anti-competitive behavior among digital giants

CNBC

One key industry group is already pushing back against the probe. NetChoice represents e-commerce giants ranging from Alibaba to Google to Travelocity and slammed Tuesday’s hearing as an attack on social media by legacy media.

“Big media is struggling to dominate again as they did before the internet,” said Carl Szabo, vice president and general counsel at NetChoice. “Rather than looking for government to tear down tech businesses, big media should follow tech’s lead and innovate so they are more competitive.”

Congressional listening to takes on antitrust habits amongst digital giants

East Auto News

One key business group is already pushing again in opposition to the probe. NetChoice represents e-commerce giants starting from Alibaba to Google to Travelocity and slammed Tuesday’s listening to as an assault on social media by legacy media.

“Huge media is struggling to dominate once more as they did earlier than the web,” mentioned Carl Szabo, vp and basic counsel at NetChoice. “Somewhat than in search of authorities to tear down tech companies, massive media ought to observe tech’s lead and innovate so they’re extra aggressive.”

Congress takes on Big Tech in hearing on anti-competitive behavior among digital giants

1 Business World

One key industry group is already pushing back against the probe. NetChoice represents e-commerce giants ranging from Alibaba to Google to Travelocity and slammed Tuesday’s hearing as an attack on social media by legacy media.

“Big media is struggling to dominate again as they did before the internet,” said Carl Szabo, vice president and general counsel at NetChoice. “Rather than looking for government to tear down tech businesses, big media should follow tech’s lead and innovate so they are more competitive.”

Tech giants under fire: Is antitrust action the answer?

Mercury News

NetChoice, an e-commerce trade group, slammed the reported antitrust investigations.

“Pointless antitrust attacks on American businesses risk stalling out America’s tech leadership as competition from China is fiercer than ever before,” said Carl Szabo, NetChoice vice president and general counsel, in a statement.

Google has spent millions wooing friends in D.C. — but will they save them in an antitrust fight?

Politico

NetChoice, one tech industry group that counts Google as a member, defended the company amid the reports of potential DOJ scrutiny, predicting this probe would fizzle as well.

“Back in 2013, the FTC looked at Google and realized that there’s no ‘there’ there,” said Carl Szabo, the group’s general counsel. “So now I guess it’s DOJ’s turn to realize that there’s no ‘there’ there.”

Silicon Valley in the crosshairs: Google, Facebook, Amazon and Apple face bipartisan onslaught

Fox News

“The Justice Department’s investigation of Google will come to the same conclusion as the FTC’s did in 2013 — that there is no antitrust case,” said Carl Szabo, VP of NetChoice, an e-commerce trade association, in a statement to Fox News. “It’s illogical that the DOJ is investigating competitors in the same market for monopoly behavior. Amazon, Apple, and Google all compete with each other in a vibrant and competitive marketplace.”