Silicon Valley vs. the Post-Trump Right

Lincoln Network

Under the proposed regime, large platforms would have to “earn immunity” by undergoing periodic audits and certification by the Federal Trade Commission. These audits, which would require a supermajority vote for approval, could force a broad range of social media platforms, apps, games, and other online services to disclose a trove of proprietary data to the government to get the legal protections they currently enjoy. And just like with Mexico, they would have to pay for it!

Understandably, the tech industry and associated pundit class were not fans of the bill, and responded with mockery and outrage. They deconstructedevery provision in a barrage of official statements, blogs, and Twitter threads, characterizing it as an idiotic solution to a fake problem promoted by ignorant populists.

Don’t Shoot the Message Board – Section 230’s Importance to American Jobs

Read the report

Big Tech to Hold Panel Against Regulating Communications Decency Act to Curb Censorship

Breitbart

NetChoice, a trade association representing many of America’s largest tech companies, will host an event Tuesday criticizing recent calls for regulating Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, which many conservatives believe allows large tech companies to censor without significant legal recourse.

NetChoice, which represents Facebook, Google, and Twitter, will host an event Tuesday on why Congress should not alter Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, a provision crafted by Sen. Ron Wyden (D-OR) to give tech companies more legal immunity to censor conservative and alternative voices on the Internet.

Report: Section 230 Enables American Innovation to Flourish, Igniting Investment Opportunities for Startups

US internet companies are ten times as likely to raise over $100 million in venture capital compared to EU internet platform businesses

WASHINGTON, DC – NetChoice, a trade association committed to make the internet safe for free enterprise and free expression, today hosted the release of a new report – Don’t Shoot the Message Board – revealing the positive economic impact of Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act on the US economy and the ability of American companies to innovate and receive strong investments.

Authored by the Copia Institute, the report reveals that US companies are five times as likely to raise over $10 million in venture capital, and ten times as likely to raise over $100 million in venture capital compared to those in the EU. These benefits to the US economy and businesses are attributed to the assurances and broad immunity provided by Section 230.

The report, using cross-regional comparisons, as well as changes over time within certain

countries, explores how different levels of platform protections from liability impact investment and innovation. According to the report:

  • Section 230 continues to enable strong economic growth. There is a direct correlation between countries with intermediary liability protections like Section 230 and economic growth. Over the next decade, Section 230 will contribute a further 4.25 million jobs and $440 billion in growth to the US economy.
  • Section 230 enables a world-leading, innovative and competitive tech industry. After Section 230 was put into law, investment in internet platform businesses tripled.
  • Limits on liability offered by Section 230 resulted in two to three times greater total investment in internet platform businesses in the US as compared to the more limited protections offered in the EU and under the E-Commerce Directive
  • Section 230 is credited with creating “a trillion dollars in value” and is a driver for American job creation.
  • US platform companies are five times as likely to be able to raise significant funds (over $10 million in venture capital) and ten times as likely to raise massive funds (over $100 million in venture capital) due to these stronger protections from Section 230 than those in the European Union.

Mike Masnick, CEO of the Copia Institute, added: “This report reaffirms that Section 230 is vital for strong investments and innovation around the country.”

“With the strong data presented in this report, there is no denying the fact that American innovation and start-up success is directly linked to the confidence provided to investors under Section 230,” said Carl Szabo, Vice President and General Counsel of NetChoice.

“Not only does Section 230 empower communities and voices across the United States, it also ignites American innovation and American economic prosperity with rippling benefits to all that utilize internet-based platforms.”

For more information and a downloadable copy of the report, please visitwww.netchoice.com/dontshootthemessageboard

Sen. Hawley’s “Bias” Bill Would Let the Government Decide Who Speaks

EFF

What does “in a manner that is biased against a political party, political candidate, or political viewpoint” mean, exactly? Would platforms be forced to host propaganda from hate groups and punished for doing anything to let users hide posts from the KKK that express its political viewpoints? Would a site catering to certain religious beliefs be forced to accommodate conflicting beliefs?

Guy Pushing Hawley’s ‘Viewpoint Neutrality’ Concept In The Media Used To Write For White Supremacist Site

TechDirt

But one of the most ridiculous parts is that it literally requires internet platforms to give extra weight to Nazis, and to punish any site that does not give the Nazis a platform. NetChoice made this point with its statement on the bill:

Sen. Hawley’s “Ending Support for Internet Censorship Act,” would force online platforms to host politically extreme content that most of us would prefer to avoid online, such as views and videos produced by the KKK.

Senator Hawley’s Proposal to End Support for Internet Speech

Ctrl-Alt-Dissent

Fortunately, it’s unlikely this bill will ever become a law given its glaring constitutional challenges. By controlling the type of content (speech) private Internet companies can and can’t host, the government clearly crosses the First Amendment’s compelled speech line. As NetChoice notes, websites would be required to host KKK propaganda just to maintain political-neutrality.

Both parties are mad about a proposal for federal anti-bias certification

The Verge

NetChoice, an e-commerce association that also includes major tech companies like Facebook, Google, and Amazon, said the bill would turn the internet into “a hub of extremism,” and “embolden extreme political movements, such as the KKK.

Josh Hawley Moves to End Immunity Privileges for Big Tech Monopolies Unless They Protect Free Speech

Big League Politics

ECommerce trade group NetChoice opposes the legislation because they admit that it would restrict the ability of tech giants to censor.

“This bill prevents social media websites from removing dangerous and hateful content, since that could make them liable for lawsuits over any user’s posting” said Carl Szabo, who works as General Counsel at NetChoice, in a statement. “Sen. Hawley’s bill creates an internet where content from the KKK would display alongside our family photos and cat videos.”

Hawley’s bill requires audits for Facebook, other sites to prove no political bias

Kansas City Star

Carl Szabo, general counsel for NetChoice, another tech industry group, said the bill would turn popular sites into hubs for extremism.

“Sen. Hawley’s bill creates an internet where content from the KKK would display alongside our family photos and cat videos,” Szabo said.