Spring 2014 iAWFUL List – Consumers in the Crosshairs

Twice a year, the team releases an updated iAWFUL list. The list provides a concise collection of both active and proposed legislation that would present a significant non-market barrier to Internet commerce.

This year’s list is full of legislative efforts run amok. As legislators and regulators fall over themselves in a race to regulate Internet services, many are doing more harm than good. In many cases unfamiliarity with technology or misinformation is driving action.

Data breaches and privacy concerns have whipped elected officials into action, but as the 2014 iAWFUL list finds, elected officials are making things worse. Read more

States Tilting at LPR Privacy Windmills – at a cost to citizens safety

Like Don Quixote charging dragons that don’t exist, states like Maryland are tilting at license plate recognition (LPR) technology.

This week Maryland legislators, listening to over-the-top rhetoric, introduced a bill to restrict law enforcement’s use of LPR technology – significantly diminishing law enforcement’s ability to stop crimes and save lives.

These concerns take the shape of potential abuses of LPR.  Fortunately, existing police policies, federal laws, and the LPR providers already address the privacy concerns regarding the use of LPR.  Read more

Reminder: The Constitution Protects Innovators, Too

This week, some businesses filed a constitutional challenge against Utah’s new law restricting license plate recognition technologies. The lawsuit, filed by NetChoice members DRN and Vigilant, seeks a critical precedent that would remind state legislatures that the Constitution protects innovators– just as it protects other citizens.

The businesses filing this suit offer license plate recognition (LPR) technology and services.  We first wrote about this last July, describing the LPR witch-hunt being run by privacy advocates. Read more

Bad Solution Seeks Nonexistent Problem: What Could Possibly Go Wrong?

Not wanting to let California steal all the headlines as the most aggressively anti-technology legislature in the nation, Massachusetts is now pushing hard to shut down the effective use of a technology that solves crimes, helps victims and protects communities.

If a handful of lawmakers in Massachusetts get their way, the Bay State will soon pass the nation’s strictest law governing the use of license plate recognition (LPR) technology. As written, the legislation would dramatically limit the collection and retention of LPR data, significantly lowering its value as a law enforcement tool.

Earlier today, we published a white paper explaining, in detail, why the legislation is not only unnecessary, but also poses a serious challenge to Massachusetts law enforcement. Read more