Buzzfeed – Thousands Of Stores Will Soon Use Facial Recognition, And They Won’t Need Your Consent

Buzzfeed – Thousands Of Stores Will Soon Use Facial Recognition, And They Won’t Need Your Consent

Also reported in PakUpdates, RTDS Site News, and Sritutorials

“It’s really curtailing innovation,” Carl Szabo, general counsel for NetChoice, an internet trade group that represents companies like Facebook, Google, and Yahoo, told BuzzFeed News. ”It’s making Illinois a technology desert.”

In Comments on FTC Workshops NetChoice Warns about Following Anti-tech Rhetoric

Today, NetChoice filed responses to the Federal Trade Commission’s (FTC) request for comments for upcoming workshops.  NetChoice responded on several topics, such as “The Consumer Welfare Implications Associated with The Use of Algorithmic Decision Tools, Artificial Intelligence, and Predictive Analytics” and “Evaluating the Competitive Effects of Corporate Acquisitions and Mergers”. The full list of responses are supplied at the bottom of this statement.

“Contrary to the claims of anti-tech advocates, self-regulation is working. Consumers today have access to a smorgasbord of products, services, and information thanks to the internet,” said Steve DelBianco, president of NetChoice. “There is no dearth of competition. The market has never been more competitive.” Read more

Virginia Supreme Court ruling on license plates creates dangerous speed bumps for law enforcement

A license plate number would not be “personal information” because there is nothing about a license plate number that inherently “describes, locates or indexes anything about an individual.” Without something connecting the license plate number to an individual, it is just a combination of letters and numbers that does not describe, locate or index anything about anyone.

The Roanoke Times - Virginia Supreme Court ruling on license plates creates dangerous speed bumps for law enforcement

The Roanoke Times – Virginia Supreme Court ruling on license plates creates dangerous speed bumps for law enforcement

A license plate number would not be “personal information” because there is nothing about a license plate number that inherently “describes, locates or indexes anything about an individual.” Without something connecting the license plate number to an individual, it is just a combination of letters and numbers that does not describe, locate or index anything about anyone.

Harvard Law Review - Ajemian v. Yahoo!, Inc.

Harvard Law Review – Ajemian v. Yahoo!, Inc.

The Uniform Law Commission (ULC) has attempted to bring clarity to this issue. In 2014, it promulgated the original Uniform Fiduciary Access to Digital Assets Act (UFADAA), intending it “to remove barriers to a fiduciary’s access to electronic records. The draft Act gave personal representatives “the right to access . . . content of an electronic communication” unless the decedent explicitly stated otherwise. However, “UFADAA imploded in state legislative halls” due to privacy-related concerns raised by NetChoice — a coalition of internet companies including Yahoo, Google, and Facebook. — and its allies. This pressure led the ULC to promulgate a revised version — RUFADAA — the next year.

 

NetChoice Celebrates Passing of CLOUD Act as part of Omnibus Spending Bill

Washington, D.C. – Today, NetChoice welcomed the news that the Clarifying Lawful Overseas Use of Data (CLOUD) Act has passed Congress as part of the omnibus spending bill and makes its way to the President’s desk to be signed into law.

“When signed into law, the CLOUD Act will improve civil justice in foreign countries while helping law enforcement solve crimes and save lives,” said Carl Szabo, Vice President and General Counsel at NetChoice. “We’re excited for the CLOUD Act to clarify the relationship between law enforcement and cross border data.”

In our op-ed in Morning Consult, Carl explains how the CLOUD Act will encourage strong civil justice protections by requiring high standards for access to U.S.-held data.

NetChoice Celebrates Inclusion of the CLOUD Act in the Omnibus Spending Bill

Washington, D.C. – Today, NetChoice applauded the news that the Clarifying Lawful Overseas Use of Data (CLOUD) Act would be included in the spending omnibus bill.

“The CLOUD Act is a commonsense bill that will improve civil justice in foreign countries while helping law enforcement to solve crimes and save lives,” said Carl Szabo, Vice President and General Counsel at NetChoice. “We’ve seen the failure of trying to force civil justice reforms on foreign countries. The CLOUD Act takes a new approach by positively incentivizing them instead.”

As written in our op-ed in Morning Consult, by requiring high stands of civil justice protections to be able to access U.S.-held data, the CLOUD Act will incentivize foreign countries to adhere to these standards.

“The inclusion of this legislation in the omnibus ensures that this pressing issue can be solved as soon as possible,” continued Szabo. “We look forward to the CLOUD Act being enacted, ensuring law enforcement has clear tools to access data held abroad while protecting the rule of law and civil justice.”