Remembering the Lessons of Right to be Forgotten — A Ruling for Crooks, Felons, and Malpractitioners

Remembering the Lessons of Right to be Forgotten — A Ruling for Crooks, Felons, and Malpractitioners

Last month, Google released an updated transparency report on the impact of the EU’s notorious “Right to be Forgotten” (RTBF) ruling made almost four years ago. This controversial policy requires Google to take down search results when EU citizens demand it. While these requests for censoring must meet a set of criteria, we’ve seen these requests abused resulting in suppression of valuable information… Read more 

Keeping self-driving cars off the road is costing American lives

Last year was the deadliest on American roads in a decade — even as cars have never been safer. In 2016, 40,000 Americans died because of automobile accidents. That’s 100 Americans each day. That’s one death every seven minutes.

In most any other context, we would call this an epidemic and call on our resources to address this dilemma. Unfortunately, some are resisting the best solutions to this epidemic and trying to stop it with illogical arguments.

Human error is to blame for 93 percent of car accidents. So, the best solution is to look for ways to make us all better drivers — or perhaps make it so we don’t have to drive at all.

That’s why it’s so important that we clear the roads for development, testing and deployment of autonomous vehicles or as they are more commonly known, self-driving cars.

READ MORE at Hill

NetChoice Welcomes the ECPA Modernization Act of 2017

“NetChoice welcomes the ECPA Modernization Act of 2017’s common-sense privacy protections for our electronic communications.  Today, our privacy in electronic communication is protected by a 30-year-old law that is decades out of date.  The Act brings the 30-year-old ECPA law into the 21st Century” said NetChoice Senior Policy Counsel Carl Szabo.

State Legislature’s Magazine – Smile, the Camera’s on You

State Legislature’s Magazine – Smile, the Camera’s on You

Carl Szabo, a senior policy counsel at NetChoice, an association for online companies, says that because “the legislative process cannot move at the speed of technology,” the industry has recently published privacy guidelines for the use facial recognition. They recommend businesses: Be transparent about using the technology; ensure the data are kept secure; and give consumers some control over how that information is used.

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American Prospect – As License Plate Tracking Increases, Privacy Advocates Press for More Regulation

American Prospect – As License Plate Tracking Increases, Privacy Advocates Press for More Regulation

“A license plate identifies a car, not a driver,” says Steve DelBianco, head of NetChoice, an e-commerce trade organization. “If you read a plate of a car driving by, you don’t have a prayer of determining who owns the car or who’s driving it.” He adds, “When the LPR data is kept in private hands, it’s only revealed when the government is pursuing an official investigation.”

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Broadcasting & Cable News – Agreement Struck on Facial Recognition Best Practices

Broadcasting & Cable News – Agreement Struck on Facial Recognition Best Practices

“Today proves that stakeholders from different worlds with diverse priorities can come together to develop industry guidelines that promote innovation and protect personal privacy,” said Carl Szabo, senior policy counsel for NetChoice. “From customer service to finding lost dogs, to photo organizing, developers of facial recognition applications will now have ‘rules of the road’ as they develop the latest and greatest tech products and applications. This is by no means the end of facial recognition guidelines but the NTIA has led a successful effort that has built a strong foundation that will enable U.S. consumers to reap the benefits of a valuable technology that will make life more convenient and secure.”

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POLITICO – Facial Recognition Talks Proceed Despite Privacy Advocate Opposition

POLITICO – Facial Recognition Talks Proceed Despite Privacy Advocate Opposition

NetChoice’s Carl Szabo, a member of the industry working group, told MT that “nobody is trying to hide the ball.” He added that, “those of us who believe that having guidelines is better than having nothing have been continuing to work.”

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Biometric Update – NTIA near producing draft of facial recognition code of conduct

Biometric Update – NTIA near producing draft of facial recognition code of conduct

Carl Szabo, policy counsel for industry group NetChoice, who is part of the working group developing the draft told The Hill: “There has been a bunch of really great work done by groups to help their members navigate the universe of facial recognition technology. What we’re trying to do is take their good work and the work of everyone who has contributed so far and kind of expand it a little bit further to address public-facing uses of facial recognition technology.”

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The Hill – Business eyes facial recognition guidelines

The Hill – Business eyes facial recognition guidelines

“There has been a bunch of really great work done by groups to help their members navigate the universe of facial recognition technology,” said Carl Szabo, policy counsel for industry group NetChoice, who is part of the smaller working group developing the draft. 

“What we’re trying to do is take their good work and the work of everyone who has contributed so far and kind of expand it a little bit further to address public-facing uses of facial recognition technology.”

“When facial recognition technology is being used, you need to tell people that it’s happening,” Szabo said.

“The idea is, if I’m Macy’s, I can’t put the notice on the roof of the bathroom stall,” he said. 

But he also said that, for fear of being overly prescriptive, the guidelines are unlikely to dictate exactly where businesses would be required to notify customers.

Businesses would also be advised to seek users’ consent before sharing information from their facial recognition databases, Szabo said.

The guidelines also suggest that businesses using facial recognition software to take “reasonable measures” to keep their customer data safe, without specifying how, Szabo said.

The guidelines would still need to be voluntarily adopted by businesses. Companies such as Facebook and Microsoft have joined industry groups at the talks.

“This is all a way of hiding the actual ball, which is consumer control,” he said. “And at the end of the day, that’s what the vast majority of Americans want: the ability to control their information.” 

Szabo, defending the guidelines, said that, “by giving consumers and individuals notice and transparency, people can vote with their feet.”

“And if they see that a store is using this technology and they don’t like it, then go somewhere else,” he said. 

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Student privacy legislation requires a surgical approach

Our nation’s schools have always been responsible for providing a safe educational environment for our children.  Today, technology in the classroom is making our schools face challenges meeting that responsibility.

But some believe schools must choose between privacy and technology. This is a false choice.  Parents, schools, students, and lawmakers can have both – it’s just a matter of crafting the right policy.

Read more at The Hill