Kansas City Star - Hawley’s CPAC debut: a moment in the spotlight and a subpoena in Missouri lawsuit

Carl Szabo, vice president and general counsel of NetChoice, a group that represents the tech industry, said in an email that platforms make their privacy rules clear in user agreements.

Facebook’s Terms say, ‘You own the content you create and share on Facebook and the other Facebook Products you use, and nothing in these Terms takes away the rights you have to your own content,’” Szabo said in an email.

“When customers choose to trade their information for services, whether discounts at a supermarket or access to free online services, conservatives should respect that agreement. This transaction is at the heart of property rights and contracts law.”

NetChoice Comments for the Record for United States House of Representatives Subcommittee on Consumer Protection and Commerce of the Committee on Energy and Commerce hearing on “Protecting Consumer Privacy in The Era of Big Data”

NetChoice Calls For Federal Privacy Legislation to Stop Fracturing of the Internet

Washington, D.C. – Today, NetChoice filed comments with the National Telecommunications and Information Administration’s (“NTIA”) request for comments on Request for Comments on Developing the Administration’s Approach to Consumer Privacy.

“We are seeing a fracturing of the internet driven by states introducing disparate privacy bills.” said Carl Szabo, Vice President of NetChoice. “The time has come for establishment of a nationwide standard for privacy online.”

“Americans should ask for a better privacy approach than what Europe and California concocted. Americans deserve a privacy law that doesn’t remove services and stymie innovation.” continued Szabo. “Federal privacy legislation should allow for industry safe-harbors similar to those in the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act.”

Read Comments to NTIA

NetChoice Comments to NTIA On Request for Comments on Privacy

NetChoice Comments to NTIA On Request for Comments on Privacy

Zogby Memo to Interested Parties: Americans supportive of ad-funded tech platforms; believe US regulatory focus should be elsewhere

From: Zogby Analytics

To: Interested Parties

Date: Sept 12, 2018

Subject: Americans supportive of ad-funded tech platforms; believe US regulatory focus should be elsewhere

___________________________________________

From August 6-8, Zogby Analytics conducted an interactive survey of 1,222 adults focused on consumer attitudes toward Internet platforms and government attempts at regulation. The survey, commissioned by NetChoice, has a margin of error of +/- 2.8%.

Key Findings

Americans believe that Internet platforms enable small businesses to expand their reach and to better target consumers.

  • Over half (58%) of consumers and nearly 3 in 4 (73%) of those aged 18-24 have discovered small businesses they had not previously known using social media.
  • 77% say digital ads are valuable for small businesses and 70% say digital advertising platforms are valuable to the national economy
  • 72% say that apps like Google and Facebook enable them to be in better touch with their community.

Read more

In Comments on FTC Workshops NetChoice Warns about Following Anti-tech Rhetoric

Today, NetChoice filed responses to the Federal Trade Commission’s (FTC) request for comments for upcoming workshops.  NetChoice responded on several topics, such as “The Consumer Welfare Implications Associated with The Use of Algorithmic Decision Tools, Artificial Intelligence, and Predictive Analytics” and “Evaluating the Competitive Effects of Corporate Acquisitions and Mergers”. The full list of responses are supplied at the bottom of this statement.

“Contrary to the claims of anti-tech advocates, self-regulation is working. Consumers today have access to a smorgasbord of products, services, and information thanks to the internet,” said Steve DelBianco, president of NetChoice. “There is no dearth of competition. The market has never been more competitive.” Read more

Virginia Supreme Court ruling on license plates creates dangerous speed bumps for law enforcement

A license plate number would not be “personal information” because there is nothing about a license plate number that inherently “describes, locates or indexes anything about an individual.” Without something connecting the license plate number to an individual, it is just a combination of letters and numbers that does not describe, locate or index anything about anyone.

Harvard Law Review - Ajemian v. Yahoo!, Inc.

Harvard Law Review – Ajemian v. Yahoo!, Inc.

The Uniform Law Commission (ULC) has attempted to bring clarity to this issue. In 2014, it promulgated the original Uniform Fiduciary Access to Digital Assets Act (UFADAA), intending it “to remove barriers to a fiduciary’s access to electronic records. The draft Act gave personal representatives “the right to access . . . content of an electronic communication” unless the decedent explicitly stated otherwise. However, “UFADAA imploded in state legislative halls” due to privacy-related concerns raised by NetChoice — a coalition of internet companies including Yahoo, Google, and Facebook. — and its allies. This pressure led the ULC to promulgate a revised version — RUFADAA — the next year.