Both parties are mad about a proposal for federal anti-bias certification

The Verge

NetChoice, an e-commerce association that also includes major tech companies like Facebook, Google, and Amazon, said the bill would turn the internet into “a hub of extremism,” and “embolden extreme political movements, such as the KKK.

Josh Hawley Moves to End Immunity Privileges for Big Tech Monopolies Unless They Protect Free Speech

Big League Politics

ECommerce trade group NetChoice opposes the legislation because they admit that it would restrict the ability of tech giants to censor.

“This bill prevents social media websites from removing dangerous and hateful content, since that could make them liable for lawsuits over any user’s posting” said Carl Szabo, who works as General Counsel at NetChoice, in a statement. “Sen. Hawley’s bill creates an internet where content from the KKK would display alongside our family photos and cat videos.”

Hawley’s bill requires audits for Facebook, other sites to prove no political bias

Kansas City Star

Carl Szabo, general counsel for NetChoice, another tech industry group, said the bill would turn popular sites into hubs for extremism.

“Sen. Hawley’s bill creates an internet where content from the KKK would display alongside our family photos and cat videos,” Szabo said.

T-Mobile-Sprint’s move to woo the Justice Department

Politico Morning Tech

Tech companies don’t like the sound of it; Carl Szabo, general counsel at NetChoice, condemned the proposal, adding, “Sen. Hawley’s bill creates an internet where content from the KKK would display alongside our family photos and cat videos. This law would turn today’s popular social media sites into hubs of extremism like 8-Chan.”

Senator Hawley Proposes Law To Force Internet Companies To Beg The FTC For Permission To Host Content

TechDirt

Hawley has set up a purposefully impossible standard. As we’ve pointed out, many people still insist that Twitter deciding to kick off literal Nazis is “evidence” of anti-conservative bias. As NetChoice points out, Hawley’s bill would require sites to host KKK propaganda just in order to obtain basic liability protections.

Tech industry slams GOP senator’s bill that would hold companies liable for user-posted content

CNBC& Yahoo Finance

A Facebook spokesman also pointed at a statement provided by NetChoice, a trade association focused on e-commerce businesses whose members include Facebook, Twitter and Google.

“This bill prevents social media websites from removing dangerous and hateful content, since that could make them liable for lawsuits over any user’s posting,” said Carl Szabo, general counsel at NetChoice, in a statement. “Sen. Hawley’s bill creates an internet where content from the KKK would display alongside our family photos and cat videos.”

Tech industry slams Josh Hawley’s bill targeting internet bias, censorship

The Washington Times

“This bill prevents social media websites from removing dangerous and hateful content, since that could make them liable for lawsuits over any user’s posting,” said Carl Szabo, general counsel at NetChoice, whose members include Facebook, Google and Twitter.

Sen. Hawley’s bill creates an internet where content from the KKK would display alongside our family photos and cat videos,” he said in a statement.

‘Deepfake’ dilemma

Politico

Opinion on earth: “For antitech activists, no fine is too high — even $5 billion from Facebook,” writes Carl Szabo, vice president and general counsel at NetChoice.

Tech turns to K Street in antitrust fight

The Hill

Enlisting help from the influence world will be critical to helping fight off that threat, K Street watchers told The Hill.

“Washington likes to control anything that’s important, and today that includes online platforms,” Carl Szabo, vice president and general counsel at NetChoice, a trade association of e-commerce businesses, said.

“Silicon Valley has woken up to this reality and is hiring accordingly. This is the normal path of any business as it grows.”

News publishers seize moment as Congress amps up tech scrutiny

Politico

The committee should “avoid creating a political platform for aggrieved industries and companies to complain about their competitors,” said Billy Easley, policy analyst for Americans for Prosperity, the Koch network’s policy and political arm. Carl Szabo of e-commerce trade group NetChoice, which counts Google and Facebook as members, blasted the hearing as “an attack on social media by big media companies upset that they no longer control our news and views.”