NetChoice Calls For Federal Privacy Legislation to Stop Fracturing of the Internet

Washington, D.C. – Today, NetChoice filed comments with the National Telecommunications and Information Administration’s (“NTIA”) request for comments on Request for Comments on Developing the Administration’s Approach to Consumer Privacy.

“We are seeing a fracturing of the internet driven by states introducing disparate privacy bills.” said Carl Szabo, Vice President of NetChoice. “The time has come for establishment of a nationwide standard for privacy online.”

“Americans should ask for a better privacy approach than what Europe and California concocted. Americans deserve a privacy law that doesn’t remove services and stymie innovation.” continued Szabo. “Federal privacy legislation should allow for industry safe-harbors similar to those in the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act.”

Read Comments to NTIA

NYC Short-Term Rental Law Is Unconstitutional, NetChoice States

Forcing Businesses to Turn Over Private and Personal Customer Information Violates the Rights of all New Yorkers

Washington, D.C., October-1, 2018 – Local Law 146, a short-term rental law passed by the New York City (NYC) Council and signed into law by Mayor de Blasio in August violates the Fourth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution and needs to be amended, NetChoice says.

NetChoice filed in the court cases of Airbnb vs. NYC and HomeAway vs. NYC. Both Airbnb and Homeway are seeking preliminary injunctions against NYC’s Local Law 146.

Local Law 146 requires short-term rental (STR) platforms to disclose private and personal information of hosts who reserve STRs through them. This law is an attempt by the city government to improve enforcement of strict regulations on STRs.

However, NetChoice believes that the law has three fatal flaws as it:

  • Breaks the 4th Amendment of the Constitution
  • Defies the federal Electronic Communications Privacy Act
  • Violates New York State privacy laws

“New York’s fight against their own residents has lead them to defy the constitution and violate the rights of New Yorkers,” continued Szabo. “New York’s Southern District Court should protect the rights of NYC homeowners. The city’s anti-home sharing laws are dysfunctional and to enforce them New York is trampling residents’ right to privacy.”

NetChoice Disappointed by Rejection of Cert for Ajemian v. Yahoo

Washington D.C. – NetChoice is disappointed that the U.S. Supreme Court has denied cert for Ajemian v. Yahoo. The case, originating in Massachusetts, reversed the privacy expectations of residents and held that next of kin automatically gets access to data of deceased users.

“The U.S. Supreme Court missed an important opportunity to clarify the privacy rights of Americans over their data when they die,” said Carl Szabo, Vice President and General Counsel at NetChoice. “Massachusetts made the wrong decision last year in obligating Yahoo to disclose private data to those managing the estate of Ajemian. Unfortunately, without legislation, the state’s residents will see privacy protections disappear when they pass away.”

NetChoice Celebrates Passing of CLOUD Act as part of Omnibus Spending Bill

Washington, D.C. – Today, NetChoice welcomed the news that the Clarifying Lawful Overseas Use of Data (CLOUD) Act has passed Congress as part of the omnibus spending bill and makes its way to the President’s desk to be signed into law.

“When signed into law, the CLOUD Act will improve civil justice in foreign countries while helping law enforcement solve crimes and save lives,” said Carl Szabo, Vice President and General Counsel at NetChoice. “We’re excited for the CLOUD Act to clarify the relationship between law enforcement and cross border data.”

In our op-ed in Morning Consult, Carl explains how the CLOUD Act will encourage strong civil justice protections by requiring high standards for access to U.S.-held data.

NetChoice Celebrates Inclusion of the CLOUD Act in the Omnibus Spending Bill

Washington, D.C. – Today, NetChoice applauded the news that the Clarifying Lawful Overseas Use of Data (CLOUD) Act would be included in the spending omnibus bill.

“The CLOUD Act is a commonsense bill that will improve civil justice in foreign countries while helping law enforcement to solve crimes and save lives,” said Carl Szabo, Vice President and General Counsel at NetChoice. “We’ve seen the failure of trying to force civil justice reforms on foreign countries. The CLOUD Act takes a new approach by positively incentivizing them instead.”

As written in our op-ed in Morning Consult, by requiring high stands of civil justice protections to be able to access U.S.-held data, the CLOUD Act will incentivize foreign countries to adhere to these standards.

“The inclusion of this legislation in the omnibus ensures that this pressing issue can be solved as soon as possible,” continued Szabo. “We look forward to the CLOUD Act being enacted, ensuring law enforcement has clear tools to access data held abroad while protecting the rule of law and civil justice.”