NetChoice Media Hits

Politico Morning Tech - Trump talks ‘industries of the future’

Politico Morning Tech – Trump talks ‘industries of the future’

TECH PUSHES BACK ON GRAHAM — The tech industry is pushing back on Graham’s plans to create a task force to look into allegations that tech companies are biased against conservatives. “This taskforce sets a dangerous precedent that government should intervene in spaces that enable free speech online,” said Carl Szabo, general counsel for NetChoice. Graham told reporters on Tuesday he wants to put together a joint task force of the Judiciary and Commerce committees to look at privacy, content, bias and terrorism in social media.

Politico Influence - Who’s still lobbying for Bayer

She’s already working with the trade group NetChoice “on their efforts in various states to promote and improve the economic and tax environment” for data centers, according to her spokesperson.

Bloomberg – Tech Group Favors Privacy Bill That Preempts Tougher State Laws

Bloomberg – Tech Group Favors Privacy Bill That Preempts Tougher State Laws

NetChoice says measure would avoid a patchwork of regulations.

St. Louis Post-Dispatch - Hawley says he'd welcome joining with Ocasio-Cortez in challenging big social media companies

St. Louis Post-Dispatch – Hawley says he’d welcome joining with Ocasio-Cortez in challenging big social media companies

also reported in Nouvelles Du Monde and Tech2.

Hawley and Ocasio-Cortez are facing resistance from online industry players, including NetChoice, the trade association representing e-commerce companies.

“Sensible legislators need to avoid the allure of weaponizing antitrust for political aims,” said Carl Szabo, NetChoice’s vice president and general counsel. “Politicizing antitrust exchanges good policy for partisan politics and creates a disastrous precedent.”

He added: “Hipster antitrust threatens small businesses that rely on large platforms to find new customers. If Sen. Hawley and Rep. Ocasio-Cortez want to support small business back home, they should applaud platforms — not attack them.”

Internet Society - International Approach to Internet Policy Declining, Some Experts Say

also reported in Finance Follow

Recent efforts to keep the Internet safe for free expression and free enterprise are “mission impossible,” said Steve DelBianco, president and CEO of Internet-focused trade group NetChoice.

Back in the early 2000s, the Internet was enabling the disruption of governments and powerful businesses by providing users ways to work around those organizations, DelBianco added. “Fifteen years later, I’d have to say that governments and big businesses have regained their footing and are reasserting control,” he said.

Fox News - Missouri's GOP senator wants to work with Ocasio-Cortez on tackling tech giants

“Sensible legislators need to avoid the allure of weaponizing antitrust for political aims,” Carl Szabo, NetChoice’s vice president and general counsel, told the newspaper. “Politicizing antitrust exchanges good policy for partisan politics and creates a disastrous precedent.”

“Hipster antitrust threatens small businesses that rely on large platforms to find new customers,” he added. “If Sen. Hawley and Rep. Ocasio-Cortez want to support small business back home, they should applaud platforms — not attack them.”

Small Business Advocate Radio - Short-Term Rentals, Antitrust, and Facial Recognition

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The Information - Tech’s Next Big Battle: Protecting Immunity From Content Lawsuits

Groups like NetChoice, a trade association for eCommerce whose clients include Airbnb, Facebook, Google, Twitter and Hotels.com, are educating new and old members of Congress on the history and usefulness of the law.

“Without Section 230, we couldn’t have Yelp reviews. We couldn’t have services like Patreon or GoFundMe or websites like NextDoor,” said Carl Szabo, president of NetChoice, in an interview with The Information. “This is the most important law for the internet that no one has ever heard of.”

E-Turbo News - NY court protects Airbnb and Homeaway from customer data violation

E-Turbo News – NY court protects Airbnb and Homeaway from customer data violation

“New York City’s fight against their own residents has led them to defy the constitution and violate the rights of New Yorkers,” said Carl Szabo, Vice President and General Counsel at NetChoice. “New York’s Southern District Court should protect the rights of NYC homeowners. The city’s anti-homesharing laws are dysfunctional and to enforce them New York City is trampling residents’ right to privacy.”

WJBF - New year, new laws for 2019

“You’re seeing states throw away the recommendations set forth by Justice Kennedy and instead doing anything and everything they can do to collect as much taxes from every small seller across the country as possible,” says Carl Szabo of NetChoice.

2019 Outlook: States Still Responding to ‘Wayfair’

“Among the new states imposing remote sales tax are some who are nowhere close to the standards in the Wayfair ruling,” Steve DelBianco, president of NetChoice, a trade association of e-commerce business and online consumers. “That includes states where hundreds of local tax jurisdictions have their own rules, returns, and audits, like Arizona, Colorado, and Louisiana, who are likely targets for litigation.”

Retail Dive - 12 news stories that shaped retail in 2018

The ruling has sparked a chain reaction of various tax legislation in the states. In December, California, for example, laid out new e-commerce tax requirements with the same threshold. Meanwhile, some trade organizations like the American Catalog Mailers Association and NetChoice have continued to push local and federal lawmakers to carve out protections for small businesses, which may be negatively affected by the burden of sales tax collection across the country. Retailers can expect the issue to continue into 2019

Retail Dive - California lays out new e-commerce tax requirements

In the months since that decision came down, the issue has played out in various ways state by state. Some trade organizations like the American Catalog Mailers Association and NetChoice continue to push local and federal lawmakers to carve out protections for small businesses, which may be negatively affected by the burden of sales tax collection across the country.

Politico Morning Tech – The Latest Privacy Proposals

Politico Morning Tech – The Latest Privacy Proposals

TWITTER JOINS NETCHOICE — Tech trade association NetChoice has added Twitter to its ranks, bringing its total membership count to 31, the group tells MT. “NetChoice fights to keep the internet safe for free enterprise and free expression, and we’re excited to have Twitter’s support,” NetChoice spokesman Robert Winterton said. Twitter joins Facebook, Google, Alibaba and other top industry players repped by the group.

Disruptive Competitive Project - Crucial USMCA Intermediary Protections Are Consistent with U.S. Law

Disruptive Competitive Project – Crucial USMCA Intermediary Protections Are Consistent with U.S. Law

However, this progress has been criticized by a handful of commentators who are under the misimpression that inclusion of these longstanding protections will lead to political bias, or represent a departure from current U.S. law.  (For more on why neither Section 230 nor the USMCA provision are enablers of political bias, see this post by NetChoice’s Carl Szabo.)

POLITICO – CEOs to White House to talk tech today

POLITICO – CEOs to White House to talk tech today

— The remarks drew swift repudiation from tech industry groups. NetChoice Vice President Carl Szabo said he is “blown away that leaders of the conservative movement want increased government regulation of business and increased government regulation of free speech.” And the libertarian-leaning TechFreedom tweeted that in “suggesting government meddle in a private companies business,” Hawley was taking a stance that “true conservatives are against.”

The Kansas City Star - Josh Hawley’s war against Big Tech could bring down small startups

The Kansas City Star – Josh Hawley’s war against Big Tech could bring down small startups

Also available in the Miami Herald, and the Sacramento Bee

Carl Szabo, vice president and general counsel of the tech industry group NetChoice, said that rolling back the law would make it nearly impossible for some internet startups to operate.

“The liability would just be too great to the point where only incumbents with armies of lawyers and dollars could even conceive of operating,” he said.

Insights Association - Should America Copy the EU General Data Protection Regulation?

Insights Association – Should America Copy the EU General Data Protection Regulation?

Carl Szabo of Netchoice contended that the FTC’s “unfairness” authority “is pretty broad,” so he asked if Section 5 can address a lot of Brookman’s concerns? And should it apply to nonprofits, he asked, since they deal with so much data, too?

The Daily Caller: The Misguided 'Hipster Antitrust' Movement to Break Up Amazon, Apple, and Google

Rarely does a day go by without groups decrying economic disparity in America. The rich are too rich, and America’s most successful businesses are too big.

And as you can expect, these groups oppose free-markets seeing heavy-handed government engagement as our only savior. Apparently, these groups have forgotten that it is America’s exceptionalism that led us to become the greatest country on earth.

When it comes to America’s tech businesses, their complaints are the same: Apple is too powerful, Google too large, and Amazon too ubiquitous. Utah Sen. Orrin Hatch called these attacks “hipster antitrust.”