NetChoice Media Hits

Refusal to Remove Video Shows Facebook Enabled Russian Election Meddling: Pelosi

Reuters

“Hyperbolic attacks on platforms won’t help solve the tech issues of today,” Carl Szabo, vice president of the group, said in the statement. “It’s obvious that Facebook is hugely invested in ensuring that its platform won’t be misused to aid election interference.”

Pelosi Slams Facebook For Not Removing Altered Video

Associated Press

Tech industry trade group NetChoice, whose members include Facebook, called Pelosi’s comments “hyperbole” that makes it hard to identify the “real bad actors.”

Do Not Track is back in the US Senate. And this time it means business. As in, fining businesses that stalk you online

The Register

 NetChoice represents most of Big Tech in Washington DC – including Google, Facebook and Twitter – and said the proposed law would “harm consumers and competition.”

“By preventing the use of interest-based ads, this bill will result in more ads, more paywalls, and less content,” the lobbying group said in a statement on Monday. “Senator Hawley’s bill undermines small online businesses trying to compete with large incumbents by preventing them from making the most from their smaller user base.”

It concludes that the bill “doesn’t give users more rights over their data, it gives users the right to use online platforms without paying for them.”

Don’t want your online data tracked? You could sign up for a list under Hawley’s bill

Kansas City Star

“By preventing the use of interest-based ads, this bill will result in more ads, more paywalls, and less content,” said Carl Szabo, vice president and general counsel of NetChoice, a group that represents the tech industry.

“Sen. Hawley’s bill undermines small online businesses trying to compete with large incumbents by preventing them from making the most from their smaller user base.The bill most helps large businesses with trusted names while kneecapping future competitors.”

America’s GDPR

The Margins

Meanwhile, actual tech industry lobby groups are pushing federal legislation along the same lines as that proposed by the tech-funded think tanks. One of the largest lobbying groups for Silicon Valley, NetChoice, has rallied behind Sen. Marco Rubio’s, R-Fla., privacy bill. His bill would roll back state regulation and place enforcement authority largely under the Federal Trade Commission, a notoriously toothless federal agency with no rule-making power, instead of letting consumers directly sue tech companies under the law.

Missouri’s freshman senator taking on Candy Crush

New Haven Register

Carl Szabo, vice president and general counsel of NetChoice, a group which represents the tech industry, called Hawley’s bill well-intentioned but overly broad. He said most of the games like Candy Crush are aimed at adults, and parents should be the ones to choose what games are appropriate for their children.

Pressure builds for FTC to punish Zuckerberg

The Hill

Carl Szabo, the vice president of the trade group NetChoice, which represents Facebook, said that such a move would be extreme and that “anti-tech activists” will not be satisfied no matter how far the FTC goes.

“I think the multibillion-dollar fine that we’ve been hearing about for some time is more than appropriate,” Szabo told The Hill. “Holding business leadership liable risks undermining innovation and leaves America open to foreign technological dominance.”

Hawley escalates attacks on online companies’ practices, says he’ll push bill to limit game apps

St. Louis Dispatch and Cherokee Tribune

But Carl Szabo, vice president and general counsel of NetChoice, an online commerce association that represents Facebook, Twitter and other big tech companies, warned that “knee-jerk reactions to perceived problems could harm small businesses and our ability to connect with friends and family.”

Missouri Sen. Hawley finds a new target in his war with tech industry: Candy Crush

The Kansas City Star

Carl Szabo, vice president and general counsel of NetChoice, a group which represents the tech industry, called Hawley’s bill well-intentioned but overly broad. He said the bulk of “loot-box games” are targeted at adults rather than teens.

“Furthermore, as a parent, it’s my right to choose what games and services are appropriate for my children, not the government’s,” Szabo said in an email.

How to read a Facebook privacy settlement

Axios

The spin is already flowing. After Facebook predicted it would face a multibillion fine, the industry group NetChoice, which represents Facebook, said that the “expected fine demonstrates to consumers and European regulators that the FTC is serious about privacy.”

Bill would give kids a ‘clean slate’ online

KSN

“It sends the wrong message to children not to think before they post and sends the wrong message to parents that they don’t need to worry,” said Carl Szabo of NetChoice, who represents companies like Twitter, Google and PayPal.

Hawley says Silicon Valley offers little good while monetizing social media addictions

St Louis Dispatch and The Neighbor

Carl Szabo, vice president and general counsel for the e-commerce trade association NetChoice, was in the Hoover audience. In a question, he tried to reinforce Hawley’s acknowledgement that “we should be doing this through market reinforcement” rather than government intervention.

Szabo, whose organization represents a veritable alphabet of big tech companies, said that Hawley “is too dismissive of the widespread benefits of social media.

“Never before in the history of the world have so many people had access to so much information,” he said. “No longer is our access to news about (the) world dictated by a small number of news outlets.

“Social media is not destroying democracy, as Sen. Hawley suggests,” Szabo added. “Rather, social media connects us to our government like never before.”

Szabo responded, “Social media, like any tool, can be used for good and ill.

“Knee-jerk reactions to perceived problems could harm small businesses and our ability to connect with friends and family,” the NetChoice executive said.

Facebook could create new privacy positions as part of FTC settlement

Carl Szabo, NetChoice vice president and general counsel, said that the multibillion-dollar fine was already a big enough statement for the FTC. “Despite a potentially record setting fine against Facebook, for anti tech activists nothing short of a total business shutdown or break-up seems to be enough,” Szabo told The Verge. “This is not a slam dunk case for the FTC and if the FTC tries to go beyond just a [financial penalty] they will lose in court.”


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Eagle Tribune - State Eyes Bigger Net for Online Sales Tax

Eagle Tribune – State Eyes Bigger Net for Online Sales Tax

Steve DelBianco, president and CEO of NetChoice, a Washington D.C.-based trade group representing online retailers such as Overstock.com, eBay and PayPal, says Massachusetts and other states are attempting to squeeze more from retailers than the court’s decision allows by “cutting and pasting” South Dakota’s threshold for collecting sales taxes.

DelBianco said the $100,000 threshold set by the Supreme Court ruling was based on South Dakota’s economy and can’t be applied to wealthier states.

“Massachusetts has 10 times the gross domestic product as South Dakota,” he said.

“They ought to be increasing the threshold to follow the proportional size of the state. It should really be $1 million.”

He expects a lawsuit to challenge states that drop their thresholds to collect more revenue.

Politico Morning Tech - Fat Fine for Facebook

Politico Morning Tech – Fat Fine for Facebook

Facebook has stayed mum on the potential settlement, limiting its comments on the matter to the multibillion-dollar estimate, disclosed in the company’s latest quarterly earnings report. But e-commerce trade group NetChoice, of which Facebook is a member, said it views a historically large fine as more than sufficient and warned the FTC against taking Facebook to court for more. “A multi-billion dollar settlement is vastly greater than the UK’s $600,000 privacy fine and demonstrates the FTC is a serious enforcer of privacy laws,” said NetChoice general counsel Carl Szabo. “This is not a slam dunk case for the FTC. The FTC knows that if they overplay their hand they will lose in court.”

The Verge Republicans dig into Facebook and Twitter over concerns of ‘conservative bias’

The Verge Republicans dig into Facebook and Twitter over concerns of ‘conservative bias’

“If we prevent online platforms from removing objectionable content, we risk turning online platforms into 8-Chan,” said Carl Szabo, general counsel for NetChoice. “Section 230 was specifically created to enable private platforms to remove offensive content.”

Politico Morning Tech - Stifling free speech

Politico Morning Tech – Stifling free speech

Not all conservatives are happy with the theme. Billy Easley, a senior tech policy analyst for the Koch-backed Americans for Prosperity, is warning the committee against infringing on free speech. “Senator Cruz is right: tech companies ought to provide an open platform for speech across the political and ideological spectrum,” he said in a statement. “But asking the government to police online speech — either through direct action or by cajoling private firms — sets a dangerous precedent.” Carl Szabo, vice president for right-leaning trade group NetChoice, called it “inconsistent for conservatives to support the free speech rights of businesses” while opposing it for “private platforms when moderating content they host.”

Politico Morning Tech - Senators Bullish on Robocall Bill

FIRST IN MT: TALK 230 TO ME — E-commerce trade group NetChoice is ramping up its defense of a law that shields companies like Google and Facebook from lawsuits over content on their platforms. The new initiative, called Protect Online Voices, is part of the right-leaning association’s effort to challenge critics who argue tech firms no longer deserve the broad immunity afforded by Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act. The campaign has debuted as a website with information about the law and statements from advocacy groups and lawmakers who back Section 230, including Democrats Sen. Ron Wyden (Ore.) and Rep. Ro Khanna (Calif). It will supplement lobbying that NetChoice and other groups already have underway on the Hill.

The internet industry is hustling to defend Section 230 after Congress passed a law last year making websites liable for facilitating sex trafficking. Both Democrats and Republicans have flirted with additional changes to the law to, for instance, make internet companies more accountable for online opioid sales or restrict them from censoring political speech. Carl Szabo, vice president and general counsel at NetChoice, argues that the law is what empowers companies to remove problematic material in the first place. “Before we consider doing anything to undermine that, I think it’s important for people to know what it is,” he said.

Politico - Facebook's FTC worries go beyond a massive fine

“This is a great opportunity to show the FTC really is the premiere privacy cop on the beat,” said Carl Szabo, who worked on privacy issues at the FTC in the early 2000s and is now vice president of the tech trade group NetChoice.

The commission can “show not only other agencies and states but the rest of the world that the U.S. takes privacy seriously, and that the American approach works,” he said.

Politico - Lawmakers sound off as Facebook probe turns 1 

“Conservatives must keep to their principles and respect that online platforms are private businesses not public utilities,” said Carl Szabo, vice president at e-commerce trade group NetChoice.