Subcommittee No. 5, Issue 19: California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 BCP (SUPPORT)

Subcommittee No. 5, Issue 19: California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 BCP (SUPPORT)

Eagle Tribune - State Eyes Bigger Net for Online Sales Tax

Eagle Tribune – State Eyes Bigger Net for Online Sales Tax

Steve DelBianco, president and CEO of NetChoice, a Washington D.C.-based trade group representing online retailers such as Overstock.com, eBay and PayPal, says Massachusetts and other states are attempting to squeeze more from retailers than the court’s decision allows by “cutting and pasting” South Dakota’s threshold for collecting sales taxes.

DelBianco said the $100,000 threshold set by the Supreme Court ruling was based on South Dakota’s economy and can’t be applied to wealthier states.

“Massachusetts has 10 times the gross domestic product as South Dakota,” he said.

“They ought to be increasing the threshold to follow the proportional size of the state. It should really be $1 million.”

He expects a lawsuit to challenge states that drop their thresholds to collect more revenue.

Politico Morning Tech - Fat Fine for Facebook

Politico Morning Tech – Fat Fine for Facebook

Facebook has stayed mum on the potential settlement, limiting its comments on the matter to the multibillion-dollar estimate, disclosed in the company’s latest quarterly earnings report. But e-commerce trade group NetChoice, of which Facebook is a member, said it views a historically large fine as more than sufficient and warned the FTC against taking Facebook to court for more. “A multi-billion dollar settlement is vastly greater than the UK’s $600,000 privacy fine and demonstrates the FTC is a serious enforcer of privacy laws,” said NetChoice general counsel Carl Szabo. “This is not a slam dunk case for the FTC. The FTC knows that if they overplay their hand they will lose in court.”

The Intercept - Silicon Valley-Funded Privacy Think Tanks Fight in D.C. to Unravel State-Level Consumer Privacy Protections

The Intercept – Silicon Valley-Funded Privacy Think Tanks Fight in D.C. to Unravel State-Level Consumer Privacy Protections

“One of the largest lobbying groups for Silicon Valley, NetChoice, has rallied behind Sen. Marco Rubio’s, R-Fla., privacy bill. His bill would roll back state regulation and place enforcement authority largely under the Federal Trade Commission, a notoriously toothless federal agency with no rule-making power, instead of letting consumers directly sue tech companies under the law.

NetChoice lobbies on behalf of Facebook, Google, Twitter, Airbnb, and eBay, among other tech companies. (Pierre Omidyar, founder of The Intercepts parent company, First Look Media, is the chair of eBay.)”

The Verge Republicans dig into Facebook and Twitter over concerns of ‘conservative bias’

The Verge Republicans dig into Facebook and Twitter over concerns of ‘conservative bias’

“If we prevent online platforms from removing objectionable content, we risk turning online platforms into 8-Chan,” said Carl Szabo, general counsel for NetChoice. “Section 230 was specifically created to enable private platforms to remove offensive content.”

Politico Morning Tech - Stifling free speech

Politico Morning Tech – Stifling free speech

Not all conservatives are happy with the theme. Billy Easley, a senior tech policy analyst for the Koch-backed Americans for Prosperity, is warning the committee against infringing on free speech. “Senator Cruz is right: tech companies ought to provide an open platform for speech across the political and ideological spectrum,” he said in a statement. “But asking the government to police online speech — either through direct action or by cajoling private firms — sets a dangerous precedent.” Carl Szabo, vice president for right-leaning trade group NetChoice, called it “inconsistent for conservatives to support the free speech rights of businesses” while opposing it for “private platforms when moderating content they host.”