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Antitrust

01/20/2022

NEW NATIONAL POLL: Americans Oppose Antitrust Regulations that Harm American Tech

Carl Szabo
Carl Szabo Vice President and General Counsel

CONTACT:

rwinterton@netchoice.org

NetChoice@NahigianStrategies.com

WASHINGTON – Today, NetChoice, a trade association committed to making the internet safe for free enterprise and free expression, released a new national poll conducted by Echelon Insights on behalf of NetChoice. The poll surveyed 3,893 registered voters and found that Americans oppose many elements of Sen. Klobuchar’s American Innovation and Choice Online Act and worry that proposed tech regulations will worsen inflation and degrade digital services.

When asked specifically about elements of the American Innovation and Choice Online Act, 71% of Americans said tech companies should be allowed to package their services at a discount (e.g., Amazon Prime offering two-day delivery, streaming, and music services).

69% of Americans opposed a ban on Amazon offering customers a choice of Amazon-branded products, which is banned as “self-preferencing” in Sen. Klobuchar’s American Innovation and Choice Online Act.

“Lawmakers should appreciate that American consumers are vastly more concerned about the bad consequences of proposed tech regulations and are not supportive of these new regulations,” said Steve DelBianco, President & CEO of NetChoice. “Voters clearly oppose the premise of the American Innovation and Choice Online Act, a bill that the Senate Judiciary Committee is rushing through markup tomorrow. If these Senators are truly representing the concerns of their constituents, they should take a long pause before destroying services the American people rely on and want to continue using.”

Key findings from the Echelon Insights national poll include:

  • Tech regulation is a NOT a priority for Americans

    • Only 1% said regulating the tech industry is the biggest issue facing the country right now. 26% said the economy and inflation, while 28% said COVID-19.

  • Americans oppose key features of the American Innovation and Choice Online Act:

    • 62% said new regulations should apply to all companies in an industry, rather than only the largest companies. 57% opposed proposals that could eliminate some of Amazon Prime’s services. 71% said companies should be allowed to package their services together.

    • 69% opposed a ban on Amazon promoting its store-branded products.

    • 62% opposed forcing large tech companies to share data with competitors, including foreign actors. 65% said app stores should be allowed to refuse apps they deem unsafe for their customers

  • Voters believe tech regulations will damage online services and worsen inflation:

    • 54% said regulations will increase prices.

    • 51% said regulations would degrade online services.

  • Voters don’t trust Congress to regulate tech:

    • 56% said they don’t trust Congress to regulate online services in a way that improves these services.

    • 72% said politicians should be focused on other issues right now.

“By huge margins, Americans want Congress to focus on more pressing issues right now, not tech regulation,” said Carl Szabo, Vice President and General Counsel for NetChoice. “If Congress does want to regulate technology, voters clearly prioritize data privacy and security issues over competition and antitrust.”

This poll was conducted between January 14 – 17, 2022 among 3,893 U.S. registered voters: a national sample of 1,000 plus 2,893 additional interviews in 19 states (approximately 150 per state). The interviews were conducted online, and the data were weighted to approximate a target sample of adults based on gender, educational attainment, age, race, and region. Results from the full survey have a margin of error of plus or minus 2 percentage points.  Topline polling data can be found here alongside further resources.

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About NetChoice

NetChoice is a trade association working to make the internet safe for free expression and free enterprise. NetChoice defends you and your business online.

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